[Infographic]: Bloggers & Brands

Topics: Branding, Creative, Infographic

As PR pros know, “mommy bloggers” represent an important bridge between home, family and parenting brands and their customers. Mom blogs have the power of reach and trust, and can be one of the most effective brand advocacy tools. But when communication between the “mommy blogger” and PR pro goes awry, the opportunity for what would have otherwise been a mutually beneficial relationship is lost.

That’s why The Abbi Agency surveyed 121 “mommy bloggers” and created this Bloggers & Brands infographic — to help you inject some life into your mom blog communication strategy, and give you insight on what makes “mommy bloggers” tick. Soon you’ll be sipping Mai Tais with the little umbrellas, reveling in all your perfect “mommy blogger” relationships. (Or not — we’re just ready for summer.) Anyway, here are some key takeaways and tips:

  • Understand the readers, not just the blog: A key takeaway is the golden rule of PR: read before you pitch. Many mom blogs focus on niche topics, such as shopping on a budget or DIY family projects. But brand reps should go a step further to assure bloggers get customized pitches. Read the posts and get a feel for their style, read the comments to understand their readers sentiment and tendencies. Consider building a simple set of personas for the blog readers; for example, track the frequency and sentiment of top commenters on different posts in order to understand their preferences. Then craft campaign content suited to their personas.
  • Have a variety of content to offer: 81 percent of the respondents indicated that contests/giveaways top their PR wish list, but many also enjoy content from op-eds to tip sheets, photos and even the “dreaded” press release. Invest in what you have to offer bloggers on behalf of the brand. Maybe a photo-heavy blog would be interested in choosing from the recent user-generated content from an Instagram hashtag campaign — as long as you have collected the permission to re-purpose UGC, it could serve as an effective pitching tool for coverage. The easiest and first question to ask yourself as a marketer when creating this content: Would I share this? Would anyone share this?
  • It’s OK to pitch on the weekends or in the evenings: We often worry about hitting journalists’ inboxes before they leave for the day and our communication gets lost in the clutter. Mom bloggers have busy, hectic lives and schedules; their jobs know no boundaries, since they live their job. Therefore, they often use the weekends and evening hours to manage blog activity and content, giving PR folks multiple opportunities to reach mommy bloggers. Need to work a weekend, but don’t want it to go to waste? Launch your next blogger campaign!
  • Not every blogger wants to be a spokesperson for a brand or product: While a little over half (five out of nine) respondents were willing to be brand spokespeople, a significant amount had little to no interest in doing so. Bloggers are to be respect and not bought. Many of the respondents indicated that they list in their ‘About’ sections that they do or do not accept solicitations to be brand ambassadors. Tailor an opportunity to partner to the style and listed preferences of the blogger. Include strong social media and content marketing components in order for both parties to benefit from the the relationship.
  • Have a budget: Nearly 80 percent of our survey respondents accept paid advertisements on their blog. Going the paid ad route demonstrates an investment in the blog and its audience, and bloggers often times are more willing to work with brands on marketing ventures if they pay to advertise, too.


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Infographic designed by: Jayleen Popp